Workout 28/02/2016 – hiking the Cathedral Range

Sunday’s workout/Mt Bogong preparation was a hike at the Cathedral Range National Park. About 2 hours drive from Melbourne, the Cathedrals are beautiful and full of excellent training hikes. Unfortunately the distance means I don’t get out there as often as I’d like to – 4 hours driving return plus a decent hike in the middle makes for a full day.

We started our loop at Ned’s Gully and traveled uphill to Ned’s Saddle. From there we headed up to Cathedral Peak (a rise of 560 metres from where we started) before heading across to Little Cathedral Peak, then back to Ned’s Saddle and down. The map makes this walk look quite small – it’s not. The hills are steep and the terrain is reasonably difficult, and this loop took us a total of just under 6 hours (with plenty of stops, rests, and breaks to look at the view. We were in no hurry).

In any case, it was a beautiful walk with many elements that were perfect for getting my legs and feet ready for the Bogong climb in a fortnight. I also trialed some new hydration methods (I just haven’t been getting this right recently), and alternated drinking straight water from my Camelbak while walking with drinking water with lemon juice from a bottle during my breaks. That combined with eating slightly saltier foods throughout the walk seemed to make a difference, so I’ll be carrying an extra bottle of lemon water on my bigger hikes from now on.

Cathedrals track

cathedrals

Workout 21/02/2016 – a big hike

Yesterday’s workout was a 17 km hike through the Dandenongs. The track was beautiful – a mix of towns, roads, hiking trails, some flat-ish terrain and PLENTY of ups and downs to get the legs working. The ups and downs were in fact quite challenging, which made it the perfect Bogong preparation trek. Not only were we getting some muscles into action, but we also got some decent kilometres under our feet which is really important. I don’t want to find myself with blisters at the top of the mountain, so toughening my feet up again after six months away from hiking is the main priority in this training.

The route itself was a bit confusing – we found it online, and couldn’t print a decent map, so we were going off street names. Ultimately it slowed us down while we looked at GPS maps on our phones, but in the end we we out on our feet for about five hours (including stops at waterfalls etc).

map of dandenongs hike

Workout 18/02/2016

Leg day!! My PT said it would be a hard one – when he says that he’s normally right, and it also normally means he’s got a fairly high-cardio circuit planned for me. That was all true today. He’s been saying recently that I’m working harder, and I do feel like that’s true. I’m completing sets I’ve struggled with before – don’t get me wrong, I’m still struggling, but I’m pushing through just that tiny bit more. It’s nice. So here’s today’s workout:

4 sets:

  • 20 x raised-heel squats
  • 20 x negatives lunges (from an approx. 5-8cm platform)
  • 20 x jump squats
  • 20 x bulgarian split squats (with back leg on the tallest of the plyometric boxes – 60 cm)
  • 1 minute fast walking on treadmill – treadmill at greatest incline (15), and at various speeds (5, 5.5, 6, 6.2)

I’m off to climb a mountain

Staircase Spur

It’s a long weekend here in Victoria- we get Monday off to celebrate Labour Day. Which no-one does, but we very much enjoy the day off!!!

final ascentI’m spending my weekend with some very close friends- we’re off to climb a mountain. The tallest mountain in Victoria, to be precise. I’ve written about Mt Bogong before- I climbed it in November, across two days, and in February this year I did the full 22km loop in one day. This weekend is exciting because the group of eight of us are climbing it together, which is something we’ve been working towards for a long time. We’ve done a lot of training hikes, and we’ve figured out our hiking rhythm as a group. Each of us has a hiking style on our own, but to walk as group takes practice. We’ve figured out who the trail blazers are- they’ll walk at a faster pace, then pause at pre-determined resting points for the back group to catch up. That group likes to power on through, and take longer rests at intervals. Then there’s the plodders- the group that will go at a slow but steady pace. This group prefers to just keep walking, but walk slowly. This group finds it harder to get going again after frequent rests, so they’ll take less ‘big’ breaks throughout the walk.

I’ll be in the back group. I’m a loud and proud plodder- resting too frequently makes my bushwalking experience pretty painful. bogong signMy legs hate me, and my mind starts focussing on the negatives. By plodding, I find a rhythm and stick to it. Going uphill I’ll take plenty of 20 second breathers, but that’s about it. I’ve recently been introduced to the Camelbak style of hydration system- it’s a bladder that sits in your backpack, with a hose that you can sip on. It stops me needing to pause my walking to get a drink bottle out, and by sipping regularly I end up drinking more water throughout the hike (I’m terrible at drinking enough normally). It also helps me regain breathe control while I’m hiking, which once again helps me to keep walking and stop less.

I’m not concerned that I’m a plodder- my style of walking gets me where I want to go, in the time that I want to get there. Practicing group hiking has been a really interesting exercise in each of us identifying our own style, and becoming comfortable with it. I think we’ve all had our moments, questioning our style (would I not be better going faster?! Why can’t I go faster?!) but ultimately we’ve all settled into something that’s comfy.

Sunday’s walk is going to be challenging. 22km is a long distance for relatively inexperienced walkers like ourselves, and it’s the longest distance some of our group have ever walked. Add into that a very steep ascent (and decent!), and we’re up for a big day. A very big day. None the less, I’m really excited to be taking this adventure with my friends, and I’m looking forward to challenge of ensuring everyone succeeds in this oddly team sport.

Check out my legs!!

I made a discovery over the weekend. I put on a pair of shorts that I’d purchased in August (that honestly were a little bit tight at the time)… and found that they’re almost too big for me now. Here’s a before and after shot:

before and after shorts

The shorts: before and after

This is really exciting stuff for me- the scales have ground to a halt recently, with neither gains nor losses happening, but I’ve continued to notice change in my body. For one thing my knees don’t feel fat anymore- and I never knew I thought I had fat legs to begin with!! I’m starting to be able to feel my hip bone on my front, and although the fat continues to grip at the sides of the hip bone at the waist this is proof that changes are still happening.

But despite the stuff I’m feeling, it’s really nice to have visual proof of the changes that I’m making. Evidence that it’s paying off, and I’m still on the right track.